Yes, We Can!

August 10, 2012

As we’ve posted many times before, Katie and I do a lot of canning, and this is the perfect time of year to do it. As much as I love fall, it marks the time when produce refers exclusively to potatoes and apples. Now don’t get me wrong, I love potatoes and apples, but it gets a little tedious after the ninth straight week. To fight this, we go crazy on produce over the spring and summer, processing and canning while everything is at the peak of its season.

Now I know I have promised a post on canning peaches, so I’m going to do a small series on the things we have canned this season (so far!). I might also include some of the other preservation we’ve done.

Today’s feature is corn salsa. This salsa is incredibly fresh-tasting all year around. The general recipe is along the lines of 12 cobs of corn (we used sweet white corn), 5 pounds of tomatoes (Romas are fine and generally inexpensive), 1 onion, 1 bell pepper (green), and as much hot pepper as you want. We used one serrano pepper.

Cut the corn from the cobs and dice all the vegetables. Mix them up and chop some cilantro, held to the side in a separate bowl.

 

Take the veggie mix and put it in a large stew pot with (3 cups?) white vinegar and bring it to a boil. Once it hits a boil, stir in the cilantro and turn the heat off, removing the pot from the heat.

Ladle the salsa in to previously sterilized jars. Tip: It’s important to sterilize your jars every time because otherwise nasty critters can get in there and make you really sick.

 

Add your lids and rings, then can them in a water bath or a pressure cooker like shown above. Be sure to read the instructions for your canner closely, to make sure that you boil your jars for long enough. Altitude also affects the boil time. For more information, check out the website for the National Center for Home Food Preservation. Their site contains a lot of good reading about the best way to preserve food.

Once the jars have boiled long enough, remove them (carefully!) with your jar tongs, set them aside overnight to allow them to cool slowly (reducing the likelihood of shattering), and for the seal to pop. When you are ready to store your canned jars, make sure all the seals have not popped up. If so, you can still use the contents, just make sure you put it in your fridge and use it soon 🙂